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A wooden panel separates the formal dining space from the living room. The fireplace is positioned to be seen from the table. The dining room’s formality gives way to a sense of elegant informality in the adjacent kitchen and family dining area. 

“Lou considered the kitchen its own house,” according to Steven Korman.1 The brick floor mirrors the house’s fireplaces as well as its outdoor patio. Large windows frame a view of the sunset.

Notes:

  1. ^ Steven Korman and Richard Saul Wurman, ICA Series lecture, 12 June 1974, p. 7, Tape #62. Transcribed by the Architectural Archives of the University of Pennsylvania

Dining room, 2014

Interior design by Jennifer Post

Photo: Matt Wargo

Dining room, 2014

Interior design by Jennifer Post

Photo: Matt Wargo

2015

Photo: Matt Wargo

Dining room, 2012

Photo: Matt Wargo

Dining room divider

Painting by Elaine Kurtz

Photo: Jon Rohrer

Photo: Jon Rohrer

Photo: Jon Rohrer

Photo: Jon Rohrer

Entrance to the kitchen and breakfast room

Photo: Jon Rohrer

Cooking area

Photo: Matt Wargo

Photo: Matt Wargo

Breakfast table, 2014

Interior design by Jennifer Post

Photo: Matt Wargo

Light study

View from the kitchen, late afternoon, June 2013

Photo: Jon Rohrer

1974

Looking toward the dining room

Photo: Jamie Ardiles-Arce. Louis I. Kahn Collection, University of Pennsylvania and the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. Housed in the Harvey and Irwin Kroiz Gallery, the resources of the Louis I. Kahn Collection are used by permission of the Architectural Archives of the University of Pennsylvania (hereafter cited as Kahn Collection)

Breakfast table, 1974

Photo: Jamie Ardiles-Arce. Courtesy of the Kahn Collection